Can You Get Pregnant While Taking Testosterone?

Taking testosterone during pregnancy is not recommended and should not be done without consulting a doctor. Learn more about how taking testosterone affects fertility.

Can You Get Pregnant While Taking Testosterone?

Taking testosterone during pregnancy is not recommended and should not be done without consulting a doctor. It is a common misconception that taking testosterone can be used as a form of birth control, but this is not true. Even people who have been taking testosterone for a while and no longer have menstrual periods can still get pregnant. In a survey of 41 trans men who became pregnant and gave birth, 61% of the participants had used testosterone before becoming pregnant.

Three quarters of these pregnancies were planned, meaning that a quarter of these pregnancies were unplanned. This highlights the fact that taking testosterone is not a form of birth control. Trans men and non-binary people in AFAB who have not had a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) or an oophorectomy (removal of the ovaries) should continue to use contraception if they have sex with the penis in the vagina and want to avoid pregnancy. Testosterone has teratogenic effects; specifically, it can cause abnormal urogenital development in a female fetus.

Therefore, testosterone should not be used while trying to conceive or during pregnancy. Testosterone treatment decreases sperm production by decreasing levels of another hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), which is important for stimulating sperm production. In most cases, infertility caused by testosterone treatment is reversible. Men who have received testosterone for a shorter period of time are likely to recover more quickly. For a small percentage of men, infertility isn't reversible.

It is generally believed that testosterone administered through injections and granules is more likely to cause infertility than gels, although any form of testosterone supplementation can alter the normal hormonal balance required for sperm production. HCG therapy is another way to support testosterone production without affecting sperm count (side effects). Testosterone levels vary throughout the day and a man's testosterone level will vary from test to test. If you are taking testosterone and haven't had a hysterectomy (removal of the uterus) or an oophorectomy (removal of the ovaries), you should use contraception if you have sex with your penis in your vagina. Testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) is often used in men who have low testosterone levels (hypogonadism). This is because synthetic testosterone can decrease follicle stimulating hormone (FSH), which is responsible for orchestrating sperm production in the body.

We have published information on testosterone and the menstrual cycle, and on the experiences of trans and non-binary people with contraceptive methods. If you've already started using testosterone and want to preserve your fertility, freezing eggs or embryos may be an option. Most trans men who previously used testosterone conceived within six months, although 44% did use medical interventions such as fertility drugs and assisted reproductive technologies. This means that trans men can take hormonal contraceptives, even if they are taking testosterone at the same time. It's important to consider those who weren't included in this questionnaire, such as trans men who take testosterone and who wanted and tried to get pregnant, but couldn't.Testosterone is needed for sperm production, but the level in the testicles where sperm is produced is many times higher than in the blood. After all, testosterone is the main male hormone, and testosterone supplementation can increase sexual desire and improve erectile functioning. Some people (including some health professionals) mistakenly think that taking testosterone is a method of birth control.

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